We love the Hudson’s Bay Blanket for its classic simplicity and beauty. And maybe more, we love the underlying belief that, even in the midst of the great Canadian wilderness with its arduous cold and haunting vastness, the Hudson’s Bay Blanket will protect us.

Originally, the Hudson’s Bay Blanket’s lightweight warmth and insulation made it common barter for Native American goods, like beaver pelts, buffalo robes and moccasins. But in the last three hundred years the Hudson Bay Blanket has come a long way. Now it is practically a national symbol to many Canadians, and to the rest of the world, an unmistakable design icon.

I love the idea of a handknit version, borrowing the iconography of the original and lending it a little homemade twist! Sized for a baby’s crib, I’m also tickled by the notion of a small child wrapped in the gear of a rugged adult. No baby in sight? Use it as a gorgeous throw over your favorite chair, in front of a roaring fireplace. It may not be an open fire deep in a white pine forest, but, hey, you’re probably not a fur trapper either!

For this special project we turned to Anzula’s absolutely gorgeous For Better or Worsted. A merino, cashmere, nylon blend, it is the perfect blanket yarn with its machine washable durability and cuddly soft coziness. And its quirky hand dyed colors give the Hudson’s Bay Blanket a fresh look, warm and bright!

So, for a great barter idea this holiday season, give a handknit Hudson’s Bay Crib Blanket. In exchange, you’ll get a whole lot of love! -Whitney

Materials

  • Anzula’s For Better Or Worsted, 80% Superwash Merino Wool , 10% Cashmere and 10% Nylon. You’ll need:
    • 6 skeins of Au Natural
    • 1 skein of Teal
    • 1 skein of Ducky
    • 1 skein of Candied Apple
    • 1 skein of Juniper

Gauge

19 stitches = 4 inches in garter stitch

Size

34 inches wide and 39 inches long (Note: Garter stitch has a tendency to stretch, so your blanket will “grow” beyond these dimensions.)

Notes

  • When this pattern refers to “ridges”, it means a garter stitch ridge which is formed by knitting two rows. Counting “ridges” is an easy way to determine how many rows you have knitted without having to count as you work. But if you find this confusing, just multiply the number of ridges given by 2 and that is how many rows you should knit (ie 6 ridges is 12 rows).
  • Always change colors with the right side facing you, so that all of the tails are along the same selvedge.

Pattern

With the Main Color (Au Natural), cast on 162 stitches.

Knit until piece measures 4 1/2 inches from the cast on edge (or 21 ridges).

With the Teal, knit 6 ridges.

With the Main Color, knit 6 ridges.

With the Ducky, knit 6 ridges.

With the Main Color, knit 6 ridges.

With the Candied Apple, knit 6 ridges.

With the Main Color, knit 6 ridges.

With the Juniper, knit 6 ridges.

With the Main Color, knit for 11 3/4 inches (or 53 ridges).

With the Juniper, knit 6 ridges.

With the Main Color, knit 6 ridges.

With the Candied Apple, knit 6 ridges.

With the Main Color, knit 6 ridges.

With the Ducky, knit 6 ridges.

With the Main Color, knit 6 ridges.

With the Teal, knit 6 ridges.

With the Main Color, knit 4 1/2 inches (or 21 ridges).

Bind off loosely in knit stitch.

Weave in the ends and tada!